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Concourse 2

Work

working

This short lesson will help you talk about work and working.  Most of us have to do it!
The lesson comes in three parts and each part will be explained with a simple dialogue:

  1. Getting work
  2. Working
  3. Leaving work

interview

Part 1: Getting work


readwrite Task 1: Read this dialogue and write down the words in red.
Can you write what they mean?
Can you translate them into your language?

John: You look very smart.  Going somewhere special?
Anne: Yes and no.  I've got an interview for that job I told you about.
John: The part-time one in the data centre?
Anne: No, not that one.  I'm fed up with casual work.  I want a full-time job with prospects so I applied to the TV company to work on their website and they invited me for an interview.
John: I hope you get the position.  With your CV, I'm sure they'll be impressed.
Anne: What about you?  Are you still unemployed?
John: Me?  No.  I've got a job at the Tourist Information Office but it's only temporary.  I'll be out of work again at the end of the summer and job-hunting again.
Anne: Well, I hope this one will be the start of a new career.  Wish me luck!
John: Good luck.  Remember to smile!

Now, can you say what all the words mean?
Look at this and click on the eye open to compare what you wrote with the answers.

interview
eye open
part-time
full-time

eye open
casual
temporary
eye open
prospects
eye open
apply
eye open
invite for an interview
eye open
position
eye open
CV
eye open
unemployed
eye open
be out of work
eye open
job hunting
eye open
career
eye open

readtest Task 2: Read the dialogue again and then click here to try a short test to see if you can remember all the words


at work

Part 2: At work


readwrite Task 3: Read this second dialogue and write down the words in red.
Can you write what they mean?
Can you translate them into your language?

Mary: Is that your brother?  He looks very serious.
Anne: Yes, it's his personality.  I guess it suits his profession.
Mary: Why, what's he do for a living?
Anne: He's a policeman.  He works in the computer fraud department.  It's an interesting job but a bit stressful.
Mary: So's mine.
Anne: Oh.  What do you do?
Mary: Me?  I'm a surgeon.  I work for the university hospital.
Anne: Oh, I started to train as a doctor but I gave it up.
Mary: Why?
Anne: Too antisocial for me so I changed track and now I teach.
Mary: Isn't that pretty demanding?
Anne: Probably but not as stressful as working in medicine.
Mary: I guess stress is an occupational hazard!

Now, can you say what all the words mean?
Look at this and click on the eye open to compare what you wrote with the answers.

profession
eye open
do for a living
eye open
work in
work for
eye open
stressful
eye open
What do you do?
eye open
train as
eye open
give up
eye open
antisocial
eye open
I teach
eye open
demanding
eye open
occupational hazard
eye open

readtest Task 4: Read the dialogue again and then click here to try a short test to see if you can remember all the words.


retiring

Part 3: Leaving work

People leave work for lots of reasons.  There are five reasons in this dialogue.

readwrite Task 5: Read the dialogue and write down the words or phrases which refer to leaving or stopping work.
Can you see the differences?
Can you translate them into your language?

Fred: Does your wife still work at the hospital?
John: No, she resigned last year.
Fred: She quit?  Why?
John: They wouldn't pay her enough, so she handed in her notice.  Does Peter still work in London?
Fred: No, he was laid off.
John: Oh.  What happened?
Fred: The company was in trouble and made lots of people redundant.
John: Oh, well I guess it's better than being fired or given the sack!
Fred: What about your daughter?  I haven't seen her for a while.
John: She's taken leave for a couple of months to go travelling.
Fred: Jenny's taken leave, too, but it's maternity leave.  The baby's due in March.
John: And you?
Fred: I'm like you; retiring soon.
John: Didn't you know?  I took early retirement last August.

Can you find the eleven expressions that refer to leaving work?

readwrite Task 6: Read the dialogue again carefully and write down the words or phrases which refer to leaving or stopping work.
Can you see the differences?
Can you translate them into your language?
Click here when you have an answer.
test Task 6: Click here to take a final test on these expressions for leaving work.

That's the end of this lesson.  Go back to work!